1963 inductees

  • Laurence "Doc" Ricker
    Coach 1963

A long time teacher and coach at Akron East High, "Doc" was best known for pushing for the so-called minor sports - swimming, wrestling, wrestling, baseball and tennis. Some of his pupils included the Woodling brothers, Gene, in baseball, and Elwood, in swimming, as well as Olympic swimmer Keith Carter. All three are Hall of Famers.

  • John B. Vaughan
    Baseball 1963

These two adversaries were considered two of the finest pitchers to play sandlot baseball in Akron during the 1920's. The two pitchers hooked up in one of the Akron area's classic duels on August 20, 1922. With Perc, a southpaw, on the Firestone squad and "Jimmy" Vaughan hurling for General Tire, the two battled for 20 innings to a scoreless tie. McKinstry struck out 33 batters and allowed only 5 hits, while Vaughan fanned 24 and allowed but 7 hits.

  • Perc McKinstry
    Baseball 1963

These two adversaries were considered two of the finest pitchers to play sandlot baseball in Akron during the 1920's. The two pitchers hooked up in one of the Akron area's classic duels on August 20, 1922. With Perc, a southpaw, on the Firestone squad and "Jimmy" Vaughan hurling for General Tire, the two battled for 20 innings to a scoreless tie. McKinstry struck out 33 batters and allowed only 5 hits, while Vaughan fanned 24 and allowed but 7 hits.

  • Edward D. Lavery
    Boxing 1963

He was born in an area bounded by South Bartges, Washington, High Streets, and called Hell's Half Acre. During his youth he literally had to fight for his life - so in 1913 he launched his competitive boxing career by knocking out Hall of Famer Willie Ames. Lavery, who weighed between 97 and 112 pounds fought 39 bouts in the flyweight and bantamweight divisions. Two of those bouts were with Eddie Rosner the U.S. flyweight champion. One was a no decision while the second, in Barberton Lavery won by a decision in a 10 round no-title bout. He hung up his gloves in 1922 with a 17-8-2 record. Twelve others were no decision contests.

  • Edward S. Kerby
    Golf, Coach 1963

When inducted, Ed Kerby had been a teaching professional golfer for 45 years, 43 of them on the Akron scene and 38 of them at Fairlawn Country Club. Despite all his teaching, Kerby left his mark in Akron and Ohio tournament golf. He captured 5 Akron district titles and was runner up on 12 other occasions. Among his 1000's of pupil's were three women state champions - one of which is his daughter, Betty, who is also in the Hall of Fame.

  • Ronnie Jones
    Bowling 1963

In 1957, he teamed with Joe Meszaros at the American Bowling Congress tournament in Fort Worth, Texas to capture the national doubles crown. Jones' contribution was a 726 series. Twice he was voted Akron's Bowler of the Year and once ruled as Ohio Singles King.

  • Frank B. Goettge
    Football 1963

A 1914 graduate of Barberton High, the 6-3 190 pound athlete honed his skill as a semi-pro before enrolling at Ohio University. However, like so many other Hall of Famers, World War I intervened. Finally in 1921, a career officer in the U.S. Marines, Goettge wound up at Quantico Virginia. During Goettge's banner years (1921-24), Quantico won 38 while losing two and tying two other starts. Walter Camp wrote, "He is easily the greatest football player of the present day - the nearest approach to Jim Thorpe of all time." Goettge was the ideal triple threat - he ran, passed, and kicked well in addition to playing defensive back. In 1942, Colonel Goettge was KIA (Killed In Action) on Guadalcanal.

  • Delbert C. Fessler
    Football 1963

This East High graduate played a lot of semi-pro ball for such clubs as DeWitt-Hall Motors, Orient A.C., Welch A. C. and Ellet merchants before going with the South Akron Awnings and coach Bill Klein. Del ran, passed and kicked the Awnings to 40 victories and a tie in 46 games between 1937 through '41. He was instrumental in winning state and Midwest championships in both 1939 and '40. Fessler was the master of the quick kick and an accurate field goal kicker. A back injury in 1941 ended his playing days.

  • Charles E. Bloedorn
    Coach, Basketball, Administrator 1963

A Chicagoan who served his basketball apprenticeship at Chicago's Carl Schurtz High and with Babe Didrickson's All-American prior to a brilliant career with Goodyear. Chuck's athletic background also includes professional baseball where he played with Louisville in the American Association. He joined the Wingfoots in 1937 and played for four years, including two National Basketball League championship squads. Later, he coached the Wingfoots before relinquishing the job to Hank Vaughn. All told, Bloedorn's association with Goodyear lasted 33 years as a player, coach, and manager as he became an authority on international basketball and served on the U.S. Olympic selection committee.

  • Frank "Doc" Wargo
    Football, Coach 1963

You can call Frank "Doc" Wargo a home-bred individual. He spent nearly all his years in Akron and most of them on the south side. After graduating from South High and one semester at Washington and Jefferson College, Doc ended up at The University of Akron, where he played football as an end, fullback and a punter. In 1925 he earned first team All-Ohio Conference honors and a year later led the Conference in punting, averaging 42.1 yards on 39 punts. Wargo went onto playing semi-pro for the South Akron Awnings before succeeding his former high school coach, Edgar "Smiley" Weltner at South. Over his 18-year tenure, "Doc" guided the Cavaliers to Akron City Titles in football in 1934, '38, '39 and '44 and in basketball his South High teams earned titles in 1936, '40, '42, '46 and '47. He tutored such Hall of Famers as Fritz Nagy, Ara Parseghian, Wyndol Gray and Gordon Larson.